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Preparing your Body

11 DPO: What Symptoms & Signs to Expect

11 DPO BFN

Essential Takeaways

  • You can test negative at 11 DPO and still be pregnant
  • For more accurate results, wait until 12 DPO to take a pregnancy test
  • 11 DPO is typically too early to experience signs of pregnancy

You’re 11 DPO (days past ovulation) and you can’t help analyzing every twinge and cramp as a possible sign of pregnancy. Are there certain symptoms to look for that mean you’re likely to get a BFP (“big fat positive” pregnancy test)?

Can I take a pregnancy test at 11 DPO?

11 DPO is still technically early to take a pregnancy test. That is, you might be pregnant and still get a negative pregnancy test today.

It’s best to wait until 12 DPO to take a pregnancy test. By then, you have a high chance of testing positive if you really are pregnant.

Why? Because implantation most often occurs between 8 – 10 DPO, with the most common day being 9 DPO, according to a 1999 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. And according to a 2007 study published in Human Reproduction, it can take up to two days after implantation for enough hCG to build up in your system to reach the threshold of a home pregnancy test, depending on how sensitive it is.

Bottom line: 11 DPO is still considered early to get a positive pregnancy test, and it’s better to wait one more day. But if you must test, be sure to use the most sensitive home pregnancy test available.

What does it mean if you get a BFN 11 DPO?

A negative test at this point in your cycle does not necessarily mean that you aren’t pregnant, since it’s still a bit early. It’s best to test again at 12 DPO. If you still get a negative, chances are higher at that point that it will be accurate. But you won’t know for sure until your period comes.

What’s happening in your body at 11 DPO?

If you’re pregnant, implantation has most likely already occurred by 11 DPO. The embryo is starting to produce hCG, which prevents the uterine lining from shedding. However, hCG levels are still quite low, and it may be too early to get a positive pregnancy test.

If you’re not pregnant, you are in the tail end of your luteal phase. Your progesterone levels are starting to decline, and your period will start within the next few days.

What symptoms at 11 DPO lead to a BFP?

For most women, 11 DPO is too early to feel any pregnancy symptoms. Whether you go on to find out you are pregnant or not, any symptoms you experience at this point in your cycle are likely caused by the hormone progesterone. Progesterone is elevated at 11 DPO whether or not you are pregnant.

Most women start to experience pregnancy symptoms around 6 weeks of gestation, or 2 weeks after your missed period. That said, some women do start experiencing pregnancy symptoms much earlier. The most common first signs of pregnancy include:

  • Nausea
  • Sensitive breasts
  • Fatigue
  • Elevated basal body temperature
  • Elevated resting heart rate

What does it mean if you have no pregnancy symptoms at 11 DPO?

Most pregnant women don’t experience any symptoms of pregnancy at 11 DPO. It seems like you should just feel different if you are pregnant, but that’s not necessarily the case. Feeling normal at this point in your cycle does not rule out the possibility of pregnancy.

Is 11 DPO too late for implantation?

Yes and no. The normal implantation window is 8 – 10 DPO (it’s possible, though rare, for implantation to occur as early as 6 DPO). When implantation occurs at 11 DPO or later, the risk of early pregnancy loss increases dramatically. By 12 DPO, the rate of early miscarriage is around 80%.

But remember, it can take up to two days after implantation to have high enough hCG levels to get a positive pregnancy test. That means the day you test positive could be up to two days after the day of implantation.

Can implantation bleeding happen at 11 DPO?

No—because implantation bleeding is likely not a scientifically valid concept. A 2003 study published in the journal Human Reproduction “found no support for the hypothesis that implantation can produce bleeding.”

The study found that bleeding and spotting were more common in cycles where pregnancy did not occur, meaning that spotting at this point in your cycle should not be considered a positive sign of pregnancy.

And when bleeding occurred in conceptive cycles, it tended to occur several days after implantation was already complete.

Is 11 DPO too early for a blood test?

The most sensitive home pregnancy tests, such as the First Response Early Results test, can detect hCG at a threshold of 6.3 mIU/mL. That’s about equal to what a blood test can detect. As long as you’re using a highly sensitive home pregnancy test, you shouldn’t necessarily expect to get results any earlier with a pregnancy blood test.

Whether you’re testing blood or urine, 11 DPO is still on the early side to test positive.

11 DPO pregnancy test gallery

In January 2020, we collected images of positive pregnancy tests from the Ava Bracelet communities. The following positive tests are all from 11 DPO.

11 dpo faint positive11 DPO BFP11 DPO pregnancy test11 DPO comparison11 DPO test11 DPO faint BFP11 DPO Clearblue

 

 


View sources

Allen J. Wilcox, Donna Day Baird, Clarice R. Weinberg, Time of Implantation of the Conceptus and Loss of Pregnancy, The New England Journal of Medicine, Jun 10, 1999

P.A. Nepomnaschy, C.R. Weinberg, A.J. Wilcox, D.D. Baird, Urinary hCG patterns during the week following implantation, Human Reproduction, Volume 23, Issue 2, February 2008, Pages 271–277, https://doi.org/10.1093/humrep/dem397

E.W. Harville, A.J. Wilcox, D.D. Baird, C.R. Weinberg, Vaginal bleeding in very early pregnancy, Human Reproduction, Volume 18, Issue 9, September 2003, Pages 1944–1947, https://doi.org/10.1093/humrep/deg379

Cole LA, Sutton-Riley JM, Khanlian SA, Borkovskaya M, Rayburn BB, Rayburn WF, Sensitivity of over-the-counter pregnancy tests: comparison of utility and marketing messages, Journal of the American Pharmacists Association, 2005 Sep-Oct;45(5):608-15.

Lindsay Meisel

Lindsay Meisel is the Head of Content at Ava. She has over a decade of experience writing about science, technology, and health, with a focus on women's health and the menstrual cycle. Her work has been featured on The Fertility Hour, The Birth Hour, The Breakthrough Journal, and The Rumpus.

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