Utility of the Ava Bracelet to Diagnose and Monitor Symptoms Potentially Related to COVID-19

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  • The Ava Bracelet is a wrist worn medical device* that tracks breathing rate, pulse rate, skin temperature, heart rate variability and perfusion.
  • The most common symptoms of COVID-19 include fever (87.9% of cases), dry cough (67.7% of cases), and shortness of breath (18.6% of cases).1–4
  • During a fever, body temperature and pulse rate increase.5–7 Shortness of breath can be measured by an increased breathing rate.
  • We believe that the Ava Bracelet could be used to generate data on early signs of COVID-19 and monitoring of symptoms in users at home under medical supervision.

*The Ava Bracelet is currently CE-marked according to MDD 93/42/EC for the purpose of measuring and displaying physiological parameters to facilitate conception and to provide general information on health and wellness to users. The device is listed with US FDA.

The Ava Bracelet is not approved for COVID-19 monitoring. This product is intended to support data collection and research during the COVID-19 pandemic but is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent COVID-19

Worn while sleeping, the Ava Bracelet continuously tracks breathing, resting pulse rate, heart rate variability ratio, and temperature

  • The Ava Bracelet measures multiple physiological parameters that could be used to identify fever in patients exposed to COVID-19.
  • The Ava Bracelet is non-invasive, comfortable to wear and requires very little user interaction
  • The data should be synched each morning via a mobile app allowing information sharing with researching physicians.

Our idea is to offer our bracelet at a significant discount to researchers recognizing the value these physiological datasets add to public health research of infectious diseases.

While the Ava Bracelet was designed to measure physiological changes across the menstrual cycle8,9, its sensors work across genders and age groups. We foresee our device as capable of providing relevant insights for men and women alike during this pandemic, including among those populations most at risk of developing serious complications.

The Ava Bracelet may be of particular interest to research or healthcare professionals who want to:

  • Monitor physiological parameters in patients infected with COVID-19, including asymptomatic confirmed cases
  • Compare physiological parameters of trial participants, including physiological changes in response to potential therapeutic agents for COVID-19
  • Investigate changes in physiological parameters in patients at higher risk of infection and complications from COVID-19, including:
    • Men (4.7% crude fatality ratio compared to women [2.8%])1,4
    • People over the age of 601
    • People with underlying conditions like hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, and cancer1,2

Some precedence for the novel use of wearable devices exists. Researchers from Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center implemented a continuous temperature sensor to help reduce the spread of COVID-19 in China.10 By monitoring infected individuals’ temperature in real-time, healthcare professionals limited their in-person exposure to patients suffering from COVID-19 thereby reducing the possibility of transmission. The Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center also announced plans to use wearable sensors to monitor heart and respiratory rates in future COVID-19 patients, rolling out their protocol to other hospitals across China.

Designed to combine multi-parameter measurement into one device, the Ava Bracelet can leverage its real-time monitoring system to fight a novel health threat. We believe the simple but continuous monitoring of temperature, breathing and pulse rates could provide guidance around if and when people should seek medical care. Furthermore, the recorded physiological data could vastly improve our knowledge of COVID-19’s early signs and overall trajectory; when sharing their data in a clinical research trial, Ava Bracelet users can personally contribute to advancing science and shape our future response to COVID-19.

Users wear the Ava Bracelet on their wrist each night while sleeping. The bracelet measures:

  • Wrist skin temperature
  • Resting pulse rate
  • Heart rate variability ratio (a physiological indicator of biophysical stress on the body)
  • Breathing rate
  • Skin perfusion
  • Sleep quantity and quality

The Ava Bracelet automatically saves physiological information every 10 seconds throughout the night, requiring at least 4 hours of relatively uninterrupted sleep each night to stabilize parameter measurements.

How can I get involved?

We are looking for research or industry partners who are currently or are planning to conduct research in COVID-19. Please reach out to maureen.cronin@avawomen.com regarding research partnerships.

We are also applying for various COVID-19 funding to conduct our own research. Please reach out to lea.vonbidder@avawomen.com if you have the means to fund additional research with our device.

How do I get an Ava Bracelet?

Individual researchers, medical professionals and people interested to track their physiology can get an Ava here using code STAYSAFE for $100 / €100 / CHF100 / £100 off.

This is a special offer from Ava to support management of the pandemic and contribute to advancing medicine in infectious diseases.

Please note that devices purchased with this discount code will not track fertile days. If you would like to use Ava as a fertility tracker, please order without the STAYSAFE discount code. We will not honor returns on devices purchased using the STAYSAFE code.

ava sensors

Sources

  1. World Health Organization: Department of Communications. Report of the WHO-China Joint Mission on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).; 2020. https://www.who.int/publications-detail/report-of-the-who-china-joint-mission-on-coronavirus-disease-2019-(covid-19).
  2. Zhang J-J, Dong X, Cao Y-Y, et al. Clinical characteristics of 140 patients infected by SARS-CoV-2 in Wuhan, China. Allergy. 2020;00:1-12. doi:10.1111/all.14238
  3. Guan W-J, Ni Z-Y, Hu Y, et al. Clinical Characteristics of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in China. N Engl J Med. 2020:1-13. doi:10.1056/NEJMoa2002032
  4. Sahu KK, Mishra AK, Lal A. Comprehensive update on current outbreak of novel coronavirus infection (2019-nCoV). Ann Transl Med. 2020. doi:10.21037/atm.2020.02.92
  5. Chen G, Xie J, Dai G, et al. Validity of Wrist and Forehead Temperature in Temperature Screening in the General Population During the Outbreak of 2019 Novel Coronavirus: a prospective real-world study. 2020. https://www.medrxiv.org/content/medrxiv/early/2020/03/06/2020.03.02.20030148.full.pdf.
  6. Karjalainen J, Viitasalo M. Fever and Cardiac Rhythm.Arch Intern Med. 1986;146:1169-1171.
  7. Lyon DM.The relation of pulse-rate to temperature in febrile conditions. QJM An Internatinoal J Med. 1927;os-20(78):205-218. doi:10.1093/qjmed/os-20.78.205
  8. Shilaih M, Goodale BM, Falco L, Kübler F, De Clerck V, Leeners B. Modern fertility awareness methods: Wrist wearables capture the changes in temperature associated with the menstrual cycle. Biosci Rep. 2018;38(6):BSR20171279.
  9. Shilaih M, Goodale BM, Cronin M, et al. Wearable sensors reveal menses-driven changes in physiology and enable prediction of the fertile window: A prospective, observational study. In: European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. Vienna, Austria; 2019.
  10. Pennic F. Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center Uses Wearable Sensors to Combat Spread of Coronavirus in China. HIT Consultant Media. https://hitconsultant.net/2020/01/31/shanghai-public-health-clinical-wearable-sensors-coronavirus-in-china/. Published January 31, 2020.

 

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